Why Selling is a Bad Word and a Better Way to Find Web Design Clients

Why Selling is a Bad Word and a Better Way to Find Web Design Clients

Does the word “selling” make you cringe?

Do you start to feel like you’ve got to go out there and convince people to hire you? Do you feel like a door-to-door salesperson? Do you get that seedy feeling like you’re behaving like a used car dealer?

Blech! I know that feeling too well.

When I started out early in my web designing career, I remember going out to meet business owners and feeling I had to convince them to hire me. I’d meet a few new people each week or month and then I’d worry about how to “get” them to become a paying client.

I tried to tell them they needed a site or I’d look at their current site and try to convince them that it needed improving for reasons A, B and C.

I felt a lot of pressure to “make it happen.” I even tried cold calling. More yuck!

It was a tough road. One I do not recommend.

So, why is selling a bad word?

The word selling is a bad word because it’s one-way.

It is often associated with you having to go convince someone that they need your services.

In the olden days, customers had very few options who they buy from and not much information when making their decisions. They were highly at the mercy of the seller.

Nowadays you can get almost anything, anywhere, and just about any time – the Web. And, customers can research their purchase to ensure they spend money well.

As a result, traditional “selling” to customers who can choose anyone and know quite a bit isn’t very effective to a web designer.

Here’s a better way to think about selling.

Think of selling as taking the time to create a mutually beneficial arrangement with a customer. The customer needs some form of web design/development help and your job is to uncover that need and see how big of a need it really is.

The bigger the need the more likely they will invest. And, if you can estimate a dollar value of solving that client’s need, it will be easier to compare to your fees.

Once you have the needs identified, then you create a solution to that need (your web design services) and put a price tag on it that pays you what you need/want to earn.

In the end, the proposal you make is an outline of what the buyer gets in return for your solution to help them.

In conclusion …

In conclusion, think of selling as “creating a win-win offer” instead of “going out to convince people to hire you.” This approach is more fun, natural, and for the freelance web designers I know, it results in more sales.

4 Comments

  1. Elena Harder · October 13, 2011 Reply

    It’s true! Thanks Ken, I’m enjoying the ebook as well! You’ve successfully convinced me I need to say no to the bottom feeders that I’ve been trying to serve.. You put it perfectly for me to see it very clearly! No more energy suckers for me!

    • Kenn Schroder · October 20, 2011 Reply

      I still fall prey to their cunningness! Saying no is hard especially if work and income are low at the time. Glad you’re making good use of the content and looking forward to future success.

  2. Kenn Schroder · October 20, 2011 Reply

    I still fall prey to their cunningness! Saying no is hard especially if work and income are low at the time. Glad you’re making good use of the content and looking forward to future success.

  3. Mitone Cooke · July 1, 2012 Reply

    I like to earn business from clients whom I have met in a friendly social way..I’ll get introduced by a current client who is happy with my work…referrals are the best way to get new work. They already know how great you are. Its just up to you to follow up and remind them they needed you and already know you are trustworthy and talented. It’s still hard work and something you have to put on your todolist. I find I get so busy in the design process I forget I need to put some time into followups so I can have more work waiting when I finish a project! Great article and thank you for sharing a shift in perspective!

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